Advert

Emotional England Players Belting Out 'God Save The Queen' At Euro 96 Will Give You Goosebumps

Published 

Emotional England Players Belting Out 'God Save The Queen' At Euro 96 Will Give You Goosebumps

England players singing 'God Save the Queen' in front of a passionate Wembley crowd at Euro 96 is still spine-tingling.

Loading…

The Three Lions took on Spain in a huge quarter-final clash and with the tournament being on home soil, they had an advantage.

What was that advantage? 75,000 fans ready to motivate them with a rendition of the national anthem.

Advert

Anna-Maria Kaufmann got it underway before the crowd belted it out just as loud - which clearly had an impact on the players.

Among those who sung along were current England manager Gareth Southgate and Stuart Pearce, who would play a vital role in the game's penalty shootout.

A young Gary Neville and talisman Paul Gascoigne didn't sing, but were in awe at what was unfolding around them.

Advert

The game itself ended up being a drab affair and it ended 0-0 after 120 minutes of action.

England won the following penalty shootout and Pearce, who had missed from the spot in World Cup semi-final defeat to Germany six years prior, emphatically hammered home and celebrated wildly.

Image Credit: PA
Image Credit: PA
Image Credit: PA
Image Credit: PA
Advert

Euro 2020 will see England once again play on home soil and Southgate's side will play their three Group D games at Wembley.

Southgate penned a letter to supporters in 'The Players Tribune' and discussed what it means to support England in an international tournament.

He begun: "Every game, no matter the opposition, has the potential to create a lifelong memory for an England fan somewhere.

Advert

"Why do we care so much?

"Like with our own memories of watching England, everyone has a different idea of what it actually means to be English. What pride means.

Image Credit: PA
Image Credit: PA

"For me, personally, my sense of identity and values is closely tied to my family and particularly my granddad. He was a fierce patriot and a proud military man, who served during World War II.

Advert

"The idea of representing 'Queen and country' has always been important to me. We do pageantry so well in Britain, and, growing up, things like the Queen's silver jubilee and royal weddings had an impact on me.

"Because of my granddad, I've always had an affinity for the military and service in the name of your country - though the consequence of my failure in representing England will never be as high as his.

"My granddad's values were instilled in me from a young age and I couldn't help but think of him when I lined up to sing the national anthem before my first international caps.

"My belief is that everyone has that pride. And that includes the players."

Featured Image Credit: England

Topics: Football, England, Spain

Daniel Marland
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Football

Chelsea Star Kai Havertz Compared To Zinedine Zidane In 'Terms Of Skills, Technique And Overview'

in an hour

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Football

Gareth Southgate Writes Off England’s Chances Of Winning Euro 2020

20 hours ago