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Olympic Gymnast Performs Black Lives Matter Tribute During Her Routine

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Olympic Gymnast Performs Black Lives Matter Tribute During Her Routine

By Stewart Perrie

Costa Rican gymnast Luciana Alvarado has used her event at the Tokyo Games to send a message to the world.

The 18-year-old is her country's first ever gymnastics athlete to qualify for an Olympics and she wanted to make sure her routine made a mark.

At the end of her floor performance, she dropped down on one knee, held a fist up to the air and paused.

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While the moment only lasted a few seconds, it was enough to show her solidarity to the Black Lives Matter movement.

She told the Associated Press that she designed the routine to incorporate a BLM message and dismantle the idea that we're different.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA

"Because we're all the same. We're all beautiful and amazing," she said.

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Ms Alvarado said the gesture was meant to drive home the importance of equal rights and to treat everyone with respect and dignity.

Sadly, it appears the routine on the whole wasn't enough for her to progress in the Olympics.

She scored a 12.166 on the floor and hasn't qualified for the finals.

The International Olympic Committee was well aware that the 2020 Tokyo Games would be filled with potential social or political protests.

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As a result, the governing body reminded athletes of the rules that curb any sort of public demonstration that could take away from the central point of the Games: the competition.

It isn't clear on what punishment will be doled out for offenders, however athletes, coaches and staff can face the wrath from three areas: the IOC, the governing body of their specific sport, and their home country's Olympic committee.

The move upholds the Olympics' Rule 50, which addresses the 'demonstration or political, religious or racial propaganda' on the playing field, at the medal stand or during the Games' official ceremonies.

Credit: PA
Credit: PA
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According to TMZ Sports, the phrase BLM will be permitted at press conferences, during interviews and at team meetings.

The IOC conducted a review last year and spoke to 3,500 athletes about their feelings on political protests at the Games.

The IOC's Athletes' Commission chief Kirsty Coventry said she has consulted with many athletes about the rule and the majority support the ban on Black Lives Matter.

"I would not want something to distract from my competition and take away from that. That is how I still feel today," she said.

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"A very clear majority of athletes said that they think it's not appropriate to demonstrate or express their views on the field of play, at the official ceremonies or at the podium.

"So our recommendation is to preserve the podium, field of play and official ceremonies from any kind of protest or demonstrations or acts perceived as such."

Because Luciana Alvarado's BLM pose happened during her routine, Associated Press says it's unlikely she will face any repercussions as it didn't interrupt her performance.

Featured Image Credit: PA

Topics: Black Lives Matter, olympics, Tokyo Olympics, blm, Australia

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