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Welsh Rugby's decision to ban 'Delilah' song branded as ‘pathetic virtue-signalling nonsense’

Max Sherry

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| Last updated 

Welsh Rugby's decision to ban 'Delilah' song branded as ‘pathetic virtue-signalling nonsense’

Welsh Rugby Union's (WRU) decision to ban Tom Jones' iconic ‘Delilah’ song has been met with some heavy, heavy backlash.

Not only are Welsh rugby fans gutted that the classic tune has been dropped, but they appear angry too.

Now Simon Jordan has joined the chorus of boos, calling the move "completely unnecessary" and "pathetic" before going on to label it "pathetic virtue-signalling nonsense".

Tom Jones. Credit: Alamy
Tom Jones. Credit: Alamy
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It was recently announced that 'Delilah', sung by legendary Welshman Tom Jones, will not longer be sung by choirs or played on the PA system at Cardiff's Principality Stadium.

The move from WRU officials comes in the wake of a sexism and discrimination storm which has engulfed the sporting body.

In a newly-released documentary, it uncovered allegations of a 'toxic culture' within the organisation with misogyny and even cases of racism rife within the Welsh rugby ranks.

So in a bid to distance itself from such accusations, the WRU has acted by barring 'Delilah', a song which talks about a woman being murdered by her jealous partner.

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When news broke of the decision, sports fans shared their disappointment at losing a song which has become so entrenched in Welsh rugby throughout the years.

Simon Jordan shared a similar sentiment, however, he didn't bite his tongue when discussing the matter.

“This is a song based upon a biblical character, that exists in fact. So unless we're going to airbrush this from peoples' perception of what Delilah and Sampson was, we're in a ridiculous scenario,” he said on talkSPORT.

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“It's pathetic. It's nonsense.

“We have a sporting body that has an issue with its behaviour and it chooses to target a song that no one is taking the meaning of.

“No one is looking beyond the spirit of the song in terms of its value to Welsh rugby, the players and the atmosphere inside the stadium.

“Where next? Crystal Palace’s song is 'Glad All Over' [by Dave Clark Five], which says, ‘I’m glad you’re mine’, about a woman – is that going to be criticised for being misogynistic, for saying, ‘I own a woman’? Is it going to be accused of being in Andrew Tate territory?

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“It’s ridiculous! It’s nonsense, it’s virtue signalling and it’s completely unnecessary!”

Welsh rugby great Shane Williams also appeared on talkSPORT, although he admitted the WRU was almost forced into doing it given the circumstances they currently find themselves in.

“They’ve almost had to do it, I believe,” Williams said.

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“They’re in a very tough position. You can’t condone violence against women, and I suppose that’s why they’ve done it.

“They’re are going to be a lot of people who are not happy, including Tom Jones I believe, but this is something they thought they had to do.

“I grew up with the song, it’s definitely part of my rugby history singing it as a player, and now as a supporter too. It’s a song that gets the crowd going and as a player that’s exactly what you want.

“It’s a difficult one for me. When you sing it you don’t really properly listen to the lyrics, and I think it’s just bad timing for the WRU to be honest. If they didn’t do it they probably felt it might come back to bite them again at some point.

“I believe as well that even if it isn’t played by the choir or played on the tannoys, there will still be Welsh fans there who will try and get this song going, because it’s a huge part of their culture.”

In their original statement, the WRU said it “condemns domestic violence of any kind.”

The governing body added: “We have previously sought advice from subject matter experts on the issue of censoring the song, and we are respectfully aware that it is problematic and upsetting to some supporters because of its subject matter.”

Featured Image Credit: Alamy

Topics: Wales, Rugby Union, Rugby

Max Sherry
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