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Spurs React After Oxford English Dictionary Add Definition Of 'Y Word'

Spurs React After Oxford English Dictionary Add Definition Of 'Y Word'

Tottenham Hotspur have hit back at the Oxford English Dictionary after the decision to include 'a supporter of or player for Tottenham Hotspur football club' as a definition for the word 'Y*d.'

The OED yesterday made the decision to include the new definition alongside the anti semitic word with the dictionary saying its use is 'usually derogatory and offensive' but can also be used to refer to Spurs fans or players.

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The club have now released a statement hitting back at the decision. "As a club we have never accommodated the use of the Y-word on any club channels or in club stores and have always been clear that our fans (both Jewish and gentile) have never used the term with any intent to cause offence." Spurs said.

"We find the Oxford English Dictionary's definition of the word misleading given it fails to distinguish context, and welcome their clarification."

The OED defended the move, "We reflect, rather than dictate, how language is used which means we include words which may be considered sensitive and derogatory. These are always labelled as such," a spokesperson told the Independent.

"The entry for 'yiddo' is labelled as offensive and derogatory and our reference to Tottenham Hotspur is a reflection of the evidence for the word. As we state at the closely related word 'yid', Tottenham Hotspur football club is traditionally associated with the Jewish community in north and east London, and the term is sometimes used as a self-designation by some Tottenham fans. We will ensure the context for this connection is very clear in both definitions."

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Some Spurs fans have tried to reclaim the Y-word. Image: PA Images
Some Spurs fans have tried to reclaim the Y-word. Image: PA Images

The Y word is used as a derogatory term for Jewish people and the club's support has had a strong contingent of fans from the community leading to opposition fans using the word against them.

Some sections of Spurs fans have tried to reclaim the word in recent times, which is likely to be the reason for the OED adding the new definition, but many inside and outside of the club aren't happy with supporters using the word.

Comedian David Baddiel has been at the forefront of the campaign to stop anyone associated with the club using the word and told Sky News on Wednesday why it shouldn't be used, "The vast majority of fans of the club, including those who self-designate as Y-words, are not Jewish and therefore have no right of 'reclamation'.

"What it will weirdly give succour to is the sense that Tottenham fans, rather than Jews, 'own' this race-hate word for Jews, a word that blackshirts painted on shops in the East End of London."

Topics: Spurs, Football News, Premier League, England

Ryan Sidle

Ryan is a writer for SPORTbible. He covers all sport from football, formula one, cricket, rugby, tennis, athletics, mma and wrestling. He obviously hates YOUR football team and has no interest in synchronised swimming.

 

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